CHATORI GALI AT OLD BHOPAL


A wonderful place for the all person who loves non-vegetarian food. This gali (street) is full of tiny shops selling fish & meat dishes with strong & rustic flavors & taste at prices that you would have. This place is just a road on which there are small shops on both sides that sell YUMM meat & fish products at very low price & high volumes.  

We get Roasted Chicken, Delhi ki famouus Nahari, Seekh Kebab, Sami Kebab, Briyani and Bakharkhani, Nargisi Kofta, Bhuna Korma and etc. here. Everything here is very chatpata in taste – rustic, robust.



REWA KUND, MANDU


Rewa Kund is a reservoir that was constructed by Baz Bahadur in Mandu for the purpose of supplying water to Rani Roopmati's Pavilion. The reservoir is situated below the pavilion and hence is considered an interesting architectural structure.


PARYAWAS BHAVAN MPHB

Paryawas Bhavan (पर्यावास भवन ) is designed by Charls Corea. Housing number of offices including office of Commissioner of Central Excise & Customs, Bhopal. this also houses the Regional Office & Divisional Office I of the New India assurance Co ltd The directorate of Women and Child Dev. Deptt. is located at 4th floor B block in this building. Regional Office of Central Water Commission and Central Ground Water Board are located in this building.

HINDOLA MAHAL, MANDU




The Hindola Mahal (In English: “Swinging Palace”), is a large meeting hall, or durbar, in the ancient Indian city of Mandu, Madhya Pradesh. Today the Hindola Mahal is a tourist destination in the ruined city.

The Hindola Mahal might have been constructed during the reign of Hoshang Shah about 1425 C.E. but may date to the end of the 15th century during the reign of Ghiyas al-Din. It is one of a set buildings making up the royal palace complex at Mandu, which consists of the Jahaz Mahal, the Hindola Mahal, the Tawili Mahal, and the Nahar Jharokha. The Hindola Mahal may have been used as an audience chamber.

The palace attraction is a "T"- shaped building, with a main hall and a transverse projection at the North. There are six arched openings on both sides of the hall having windows on top, filled with beautiful tracery work providing path to light and air to come in. Side walls are further strengthened with massive slopes to counteract the force of the lofty arches which once supported the huge ceiling at the top. Its "T"- shaped projection was later added to provide a well-guarded approach for the king. The Interior of Hindola Mahal is planned like a cross formed by the main passage leading to the hall and by another passage crossing it at right angles in the mid passages. Mix of the materials used at different parts of the building suggests that the architectural additions are done at various intervals of time.